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  • BlackBerry Returns With 3 Possible New Phones in 2017, But Do You Care?
    The BlackBerry KeyOne, which the company unveiled at MWC, may soon see some siblings. From a report on CNET: TCL isn't wasting time building up its portfolio of phones using the BlackBerry name. The company plans to release as many as three phones this year, TCL Communications Nicolas Zibell said in an interview on Saturday. The company is working on an all-touchscreen version, a spiritual successor to the DTEK 50 and DTEK 60 phones, which it also built for BlackBerry itself, according to a source familiar with the rollout plans. TCL will likely get rid of the DTEK branding, the source said.

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  • Microsoft Announces Xbox Game Pass, Netflix-Style Gaming For the Xbox One
    Microsoft today announced it is moving into the world of Netflix-style game subscriptions with Xbox Game Pass, a monthly service coming this spring that will give you a selection of games you can download and play on your Xbox One for $9.99 a month. From a report on Polygon: The service will include "over 100 games," including Halo 5: Guardians, Payday 2, NBA 2K16 and SoulCalibur II. "One of the best things about Xbox Game Pass is that you can discover and download the full titles directly on your Xbox One," the official post states. Any game you buy through the service will be sold to you at a 20 percent discount. An alpha preview of the program begins today with "a very limited" number of games, and Xbox Live Gold subscribers will get first crack at the program this spring. It also sounds as if the service may be available, at least in part, on the PC.

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  • Netflix CEO Predicts Mobile Operators Will Soon Offer Unlimited Video
    An anonymous reader shares an AFP report: Netflix head Reed Hastings predicted Monday that mobile carriers will soon offer data plans that give users unlimited video streaming to meet the rising popularity of watching TV and movies on mobile devices. Carriers offer unlimited data caps but they are usually very expensive. But Hastings said he believed mobile carriers will eventually create a two-tear system where video data is unlimited to meet the growing demand for watching TV series and movies on mobile devices. "What we are going to see I think is a number of companies pioneering new ways of offering services to the consumers where it is unlimited video data but it is limited to say one megabit speed," he said. "So it is a slower speed but you get unlimited data on that and that turns out to be very efficient on network so an operator can offer unlimited viewing."

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero W is a $10 Computer With Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
    On the fifth birthday of the original Raspberry Pi, the foundation has announced the Raspberry Pi Zero W, a slightly more capable variant of the miniature computer. From a report on BetaNews: It's essentially a Pi Zero with the addition of the two features many people have been requesting -- wireless LAN and Bluetooth. Priced at $10, the Pi Zero W uses the same Cypress CYW43438 wireless chip as Raspberry Pi 3 Model B to deliver 802.11n wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity. The full list of features is as follows: 1GHz, single-core CPU, 512MB RAM, mini-HDMI port, micro-USB On-The-Go port, micro-USB power, HAT-compatible 40-pin header, composite video and reset headers, CSI camera connector, 11n wireless LAN, and Bluetooth 4.0.

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  • For This Year's iPhone, Apple Is Ditching Lightning Connector and Home Button, But Embracing USB Type-C and Curved Display
    Apple has decided to adopt a flexible display for at least one model of the new iPhone, reports WSJ. From the report: People with direct knowledge of Apple's production plans said the Cupertino, Calif., company has decided to go ahead with the technology, and it will release a phone model using the OLED screens this year (Editor's note: the link could be paywalled; alternate source). The technology allows manufacturers to bend screens in ways they couldn't previously -- such as by introducing a curve at the edge of the phone as in some Samsung models. However, once the phone is manufactured, the OLED screen can't be bent or folded by the user, at least with current technology. Using OLED displays would allow Apple to introduce a phone with a new look to fuel sales. They said Apple would introduce other updates including a USB-C port for the power cord and other peripheral devices instead of the company's original Lightning connector. The models would also do away with a physical home button, they said. Those updates would give the iPhone features already available on other smartphones.

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  • CloudPets IoT Toys Leaked and Ransomed, Exposing Kids' Voice Messages
    "According to security researcher Troy Hunt, a series of web-connected, app-enabled toys called CloudPets have been hacked," reports Android Police. "The manufacturer's central database was reportedly compromised over several months after stunningly poor security, despite the attempts of many researchers and journalists to inform the manufacturer of the potential danger. Several ransom notes were left, demanding Bitcoin payments for the implied deletion of stolen data." From the report: CloudPets allow parents to record a message for their children on their phones, which then arrives on the Bluetooth connected stuffed toy and is played back. Kids can squeeze the stuffed animal's paw to record a message of their own, which is sent back to the phone app. The Android app has been downloaded over 100,000 times, though user reviews are poor, citing a difficult interface, frequent bugs, and annoying advertising. Hunt and the researchers he collaborated with found that the central database for CloudPets' voice messages and user info was stored on a public-facing MongoDB server, with only basic hashes protecting user addresses and passwords. The same database apparently connected to the stored voice messages that could be retrieved by the apps and toys. Easy access and poor password requirements may have resulted in unauthorized access to a large number of accounts. The database was finally removed from the publicly accessible server in January, but not before demands for ransom were left.

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  • One Billion Hours of YouTube Are Watched Every Day
    YouTube announced in a blog post that people around the world are now watching a billion hours of YouTube videos every single day. According to YouTube, "If you were to sit and watch a billion hours of YouTube, it would take you over 100,000 years." Mashable reports: The milestone "represents the enjoyment of the fantastically diverse videos that creative people make every single day," Cristos Goodrow, VP of engineering at YouTube, wrote in a blog post Monday. "Around the world, people are spending a billion hours every day rewarding their curiosity, discovering great music, keeping up with the news, connecting with their favorite personalities, or catching up with the latest trend." The 1 billion figure is a 10-fold increase since 2012, YouTube said. The statistic is one that underscores YouTube's efforts to dominate the digital space. On YouTube -- which operates under the motto "Broadcast Yourself" -- users upload 400 hours of video each minute, or 65 years of video a day.

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  • Man Gets 30 Days In Jail For Drone Crash That Knocked Woman Unconscious
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The operator of a drone that knocked a woman unconscious was sentenced Friday to 30 days in jail, Seattle prosecutors said. The woman was attending a local parade when the drone crashed and struck her. Paul Skinner, a 38-year-old man from Washington state, was charged with reckless endangerment in connection to the 2015 incident, in which an 18-inch-by-18-inch drone collided into a building before falling into a crowd. The authorities said the 2-pound drone struck the 25-year-old in the head and gave her a concussion. Her boyfriend caught her before she fell to the ground. Another man suffered a minor bruise. The accident took place during during the city's Pride Parade. Skinner, who had turned himself in, plans to appeal the sentence. His attorney, Jeffrey Kradel, said the punishment was "too severe." His client remains free pending the appeal's outcome. A misdemeanor reckless endangerment charge -- one that poses "substantial risk of death or serious bodily injury to another person" -- carries a penalty of up to a year in jail.

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  • Scraping By On Six Figures? Tech Workers Feel Poor in Silicon Valley's Wealth Bubble
    Big tech companies pay some of the country's best salaries. But workers claim the high cost of living in the Bay Area has them feeling financially strained, reports The Guardian. One Twitter employee cited in the story, who earns a base salary of $160,000 a year, said his earnings are "pretty bad", adding that he pays $3000 rent for a two-bedroom house in San Francisco. From the article: Silicon Valley's latest tech boom has caused rents to soar over the last five years. The city's rents, by one measure, are now the highest in the world. The prohibitive costs have displaced teachers, city workers, firefighters and other members of the middle class, not to mention low-income residents. Now techies, many of whom are among the highest 1 percent of earners, are complaining that they, too, are being priced out. The Twitter employee said he hit a low point in early 2014 when the company changed its payroll schedule, leaving him with a hole in his budget. "I had to borrow money to make it through the month." He was one of several tech workers, earning between $100,000 and $700,000 a year, who vented to the Guardian about their financial situation.

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  • First Signs of Obesity In Some Arctic Groups Have Been Linked To Instant Noodles
    schwit1 quotes a report from ScienceAlert: Researchers have noted the first signs of obesity in the native ethnic groups of the Yamalo-Nenets region -- an autonomous district that sits on the coast of the Arctic Ocean in Northwest Siberia. According to local experts, obesity has not previously existed in these indigenous populations, but the first cases are now being reported, and a marked change in diet -- including instant noodles and pasta -- appears to be responsible. The Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug has a population of just over 522,000 people, whose ancestors have survived the permafrost for millennia. The nomadic Nenets and Khanty peoples have been herding reindeer up and down the Yamal tundra -- a 700-km-long peninsula that stretches deep into the Arctic Ocean -- for 1,000 years, with diets heavily based on venison and fish. But that appears to be changing fast, as researchers note the increasing uptake of chemically processed foods, such as instant noodles and pasta, and the addition of sugar, pastry, and bread to their diets. According to Titovsky, these changes -- which have only been occurring over the past few years -- have seen the intake of venison and river fish cut by half.

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rss: digg

  • A Visit To The Infowars Studios Of Alex Jones
    Right-wing radio host Alex Jones is America's top conspiracy theorist. He has millions of listeners, but his most powerful one happens to be the president of the United States.

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  • Review Roundup: Is 'Logan' Any Good?
    Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart say it's their last "X-Men" movie. Wolverine is busted-up, drunk, and tired. "Logan" is flexing its gritty take and R-rating as if to say to other comic book movies: "Come at me, bub."

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  • Worse Than Tuskegee?
    Seventy years ago, American researchers infected Guatemalans with syphilis and gonorrhea, then left without treating them. Their families are still waiting for help.

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  • This App Just Made Networking Not Suck (And No, It's Not Tinder)
    What Tinder did for dating, this company is doing for networking. Shapr connects you with all the inspiring people you live near but would never meet. The result? More inspired, meaningful and connected collaboration.

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  • Jon Stewart Steals Colbert's Desk, Tells The Media To Stop Bellyaching Over Their Break-Up With Trump
    Jon Stewart stopped by "Late Night" to drop some much-needed relationship advice for the media ? who is looking increasingly desperate.

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  • What It?s Like Inside A Wall Street Executive Kitchen
    Chef JJ Johnson spent three years cooking for high-rollers in Morgan Stanley?s secret "restaurant."

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  • Trump Accuses Obama Of Stoking Protests Against Him, And Other Trump News From Today
    All the Trump news you'll need to read from Tuesday.

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  • 'All Bark And No Bite,' Illustrated To Perfection By Dogs
    Don't open that gate ? those dogs will tear each other apart! Oh, no, they're fine actually. Couldn't be bothered.

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  • The Difference Between Apple And Google, Illustrated By Their Patent Structures
    Apple is driven largely by a centralized development structure, stemming from its fabled design studio, whereas Google has a more distributed, open-source approach to new products.

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  • Self-Righteous Devils: The Ozark Vigilantes Of The 1880s
    The story of the Bald Knobbers' rise is a terrifying parable about what happens when government fails and violence reigns. It's a lesson that?s perhaps more relevant in the political climate of 2017 than Americans would like it to be.

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rss: the register

  • 2017 was a record year for us, says Workday CEO

    Big wins push sales to record high as expenses push losses to record high

    It was a record-breaking year for finance and HR cloud purveyor Workday for all the right and the wrong reasons: sales reached a new high aided by Oracle?s disruptive buy of NetSuite, but losses soared too.?



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  • Scality guarantees 100% availability

    Look how good I look underneath my Cloud HALO

    Object storage house Scality is offering a 100 per cent data availability guarantee. How so??



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  • The most l33t phone of MWC: DarkMatter's Kubit

    The secure, self destructing mobe for heads of state... and big enterprises

    MWC There?s exclusive and then there?s exclusive. If you need to ask how much the DarkMatter Katim phone costs, you?re not a serious customer. The first handset to come from the UAE-based security company doesn?t have a price.?



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  • Cisco Jasper IoT bod: Smart home? Nah. Farm pest control - that's a cool use case

    Connected device expert on post-Borg IoT

    Interview Macario Namie, head of IoT strategy at Cisco Jasper, has been working in the connected device space "before it was known as IoT? and was with Jasper for nine years before it was acquired by the networking borg in 2016 for $1.4bn (1.1bn).?



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  • Health firm gets 200k slap after IVF patients' data leaks online

    Indian subcontractor kept transcripts on insecure server

    A private health firm has been fined 200,000 after fertility patients? confidential conversations leaked online.?



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  • Imation to fork out $11m in patent suit

    IronKey flash drive patent was at stake

    A jury has found that flash-flinger Imation must pay $11m damages to ioengine for patent infringement.?



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  • IBM UK: Oh, remote workers. We want to be colocated with you again

    Exec professes love for 'colocation hubs'... just 'not sure everyone else will'

    Exclusive IBM is clamping down on its remote workers in Britain, with the Global Technology Services team being centralised in one of a number of as yet unnamed ?colocation hubs?.?



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  • Continuous Lifecycle: Early bird tickets ready to fly

    Just two weeks to save 100s on DevOps/Containers extravaganza

    You?ve got less than two weeks to snag early bird tickets for Continuous Lifecycle London and save yourself a packet on three days of the best in DevOps, Containers, Continuous Delivery and Agile.?



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  • AWS's Kubernetes dilemma: It's a burden and a pleasure

    Keep the devs happy, or Microsoft and Google will catch you

    Amazon Web Services became the 800-pound cloud gorilla by catering to developers. It expects to own the container crown with the exact same strategy, touting convenience and productivity gains to users of its EC2 Container Service (ECS). There are signs, however, that this fight won?t be as simple, and that a cross-cloud container option like Kubernetes could be the spoiler to Amazon?s steady march.?



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  • Revealed: UK councils shrug at privacy worries, strap on body cams

    Of 227 snooping local authorities, only a third cared how it might affect the public

    More than half of the UK?s local authorities have used body-worn cameras, with only a third of them having considered the privacy impact on the public, according to best practice.?



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